Home Personal Finance Woman reveals how she finally got smarter about her money in her 30s to become more financially stable

Woman reveals how she finally got smarter about her money in her 30s to become more financially stable

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By Rachel Summer Small For Dailymail.Com

15:54 25 Jan 2024, updated 15:56 25 Jan 2024

  • Jules Rogers, from Portland, penned a Business Insider essay about her finances
  • ‘I spend my money differently than I did in my 20s,’ the 31-year-old described
  • She has shifted her outlook to making more, while keeping expenses at bay 



A woman has broken down the steps she took to finally get more responsible with her money once she reached her 30s. 

Jules Rogers, a journalist and editor based in Portland, Oregon, penned an essay for Business Insider about how she shifted from making less and spending more frivolously in her 20s – to making more, while keeping expenses at bay, in her 30s.

‘As a 31-year-old, I’m approaching how I spend my money differently than I did in my 20s,’ she stated.

The biggest change she made, she explained, was that, in 2022, she and her spouse had closed on a townhouse in the affluent Portland neighborhood of Southwest Hills.

Jules Rogers from Portland, Oregon, reflected on how she’s doubled down on financial responsibility now that she’s in her 30s

‘The monthly mortgage payment for our two-bedroom, two-bathroom home is nearly double that of renting a one-bedroom, including the HOA,’ wrote Jules.

‘But since I make a little more, my cars are paid off, and we’re not paying yearly moving expenses, so it’s worth it.’

Jules also emphasized the importance of maintaining the investments accounts she got off the ground in her 20s.

She recalled a math teacher had once told her about the concept of exponential growth, which is possible with a Roth IRA. 

Even when she was on a paper-thin budget, she prioritized putting earnings in the Roth IRA. 

And, whenever she would be working full time, she’d also build up a 401k through her employer. 

As for discretionary spending, Jules has always kept a tight leash on where her money goes.

‘Keeping a spreadsheet in my 20s helped me determine and balance my top discretionary expenditures – groceries, hygiene and beauty, clothing, and going out and entertainment,’ she described.

She penned an essay for Business Insider about how she shifted from making less and spending more frivolously in her 20s – to making more, while keeping expenses at bay, in her 30s (stock image)

‘I always ensure these categories are paid in cash and pay my credit-card bill in full monthly,’ she added.

Further, keeping those habits in her 20s prepared her for skyrocketing grocery bills as of late, as well as $150 per month student loan payments. 

Along with that, she coined the cute term ‘Homebucks’ in reference to dollars she saves up by not going to Starbucks – and instead getting caffeinated through her at-home espresso machine or French press – and generally ‘eating out less.’ 

As for getting her nails done – while the prospect is always ‘tempting’ – Jules instead ‘splurged on a UV/LED light to upgrade my game and do them myself.’

When it came to nightlife in her 20s, Jules recalled how she ‘felt like I had to try every happy hour and rooftop bar, and I wanted to get out of my small apartment.’

But lately, she’s preferred ‘staying home’ – and making herself a batch of frozen fries. 

Among her other hobbies, Jules enjoy gaming – and is happy with the Nintendo Switch she got in her mid-20s. 

She also reads the free e-books offered by Kindle. 

And, last but not least, Jules sets aside $10 out of her budget for ‘arts and crafts.’ 

She recently restored a childhood doll house gifted to her by her aunt – and creating, among other features, Popsicle-stick flooring.  

‘It’s been nice to bring back this old hobby and pass it on,’ the savvy saver gushed. Plus, it provided her with ‘hours of crafting time.’

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